All posts by Mark Moore

FRATERNAL BONDS: Union Cpl. Gershom H. Swayze and the Confederate Battle Flag of the 40th North Carolina Regiment

FRATERNAL BONDS: Union Cpl. Gershom H. Swayze and the Confederate Battle Flag of the 40th North Carolina Regiment
By Mark A. Moore
Author of The Old North State at War: The North Carolina Civil War Atlas

The author’s guidebook ‘The Battle of Bentonville,’ originally published in 1997, is currently being revised and expanded for release in 2019.

In the late winter of 1865, the armies of the Union hammered the final nails into the coffin of the Confederacy. After the fall of Fort Fisher and the port of Wilmington, Gen. William T. Sherman’s 60,000-man Union army blazed through North Carolina, leading to the culmination of the Carolinas Campaign at the Battle of Bentonville, fought March 19-21. Virtually unopposed, the Union juggernaut had covered more than 400 miles on foot between Savannah, Georgia, and Bentonville. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston struggled to assemble a hodgepodge Confederate army from far-flung units, but managed to concentrate a partial force to resist Sherman’s advance between the Cape Fear and Neuse Rivers. Their final clash occurred just 20 miles short of Sherman’s ultimate destination of Goldsboro, North Carolina.

Continue reading FRATERNAL BONDS: Union Cpl. Gershom H. Swayze and the Confederate Battle Flag of the 40th North Carolina Regiment

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HAUNTED BENTONVILLE: Blue Jim Weaver and the Phantom Battle

HAUNTED BENTONVILLE: Some Facts behind the Folklore
By Mark A. Moore
Author of The Old North State at War: The North Carolina Civil War Atlas

For historical background and Part 1 of this series, see Haunted Bentonville: The Devil’s Racetrack.

PART 2 — Blue Jim Weaver and the Phantom Battle

Late one night in the fall of 1905, a Bentonville resident experienced a frightening incident while hunting in the woods on the battlefield.

The Story

“We had a neighbor by the name of Jim Weaver,” explained Bentonville native and area historian Herschell V. Rose in 1952. “I heard [the] story . . . as far back as the turn of the century. Time and again I have listened to Weaver tell his story which was a whopper of its kind and withal a good one.” Born on January 17, 1887, Rose was about 18 years old when the incident occurred, and thus grew to adulthood hearing one of the best known ghost stories associated with the battlefield.

Continue reading HAUNTED BENTONVILLE: Blue Jim Weaver and the Phantom Battle

HAUNTED BENTONVILLE: The Devil’s Racetrack

HAUNTED BENTONVILLE: Some Facts behind the Folklore
By Mark A. Moore
Author of The Old North State at War: The North Carolina Civil War Atlas

In the late winter of 1865, Gen. William T. Sherman’s 60,000-man Union army blazed through North Carolina, leading to the culmination of the Carolinas Campaign at the Battle of Bentonville, fought March 19-21. Virtually unopposed, the Union juggernaut had covered more than 400 miles on foot between Savannah, Georgia, and Bentonville. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston struggled to assemble a hodgepodge Confederate army from far-flung units, but managed to concentrate a partial force to resist Sherman’s advance between the Cape Fear and Neuse Rivers. Their final clash occurred just 20 miles short of Sherman’s ultimate destination of Goldsboro, North Carolina.

Battle of Bentonville
The UNION and CONFEDERATE Armies Converge on BENTONVILLE, March 1865 — Map by MARK A. MOORE. Adapted from “THE OLD NORTH STATE AT WAR: THE NORTH CAROLINA CIVIL WAR ATLAS”

Continue reading HAUNTED BENTONVILLE: The Devil’s Racetrack

The Pied Piper of Woodstock

The Pied Piper of Woodstock: Artie Kornfeld and the Birth of an Iconic Film
By Mark A. Moore
Author of The Jan & Dean Record

I had the fun of serving as an editor on this book for Artie Kornfeld, co-creator of the Woodstock Music and Arts Fair in August 1969, and one of Jan Berry’s Screen Gems songwriting partners .

The story of Woodstock is legendary . . . “3 Days of Peace & Music” during the turbulent height of the Vietnam War . . . but it took some eleventh-hour scrambling to bring everything together.

Three days before the festival—which was destined to become one of the biggest cultural events of the twentieth century—Artie approached Freddy Weintraub, vice president of East Coast production for Warner Bros., at Freddy’s office in the Pan Am Building in Manhattan, New York City. Artie and Freddy were old friends and colleagues. Among other industry connections, Freddy had managed Leon Bibb, an artist that Kornfeld had produced when Artie worked for Mercury Records.

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